Wednesday, 7 April 2021

Whitehall Whitewash over Greensill

Over the past month a major political scandal has been slowly emerging across Whitehall, involving former Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron and an Australian banker, Lex Greensill, who inveigled himself into Cameron’s inner s circle to such an extent that he was able to swan around Government departments ten years ago touting for business for his financing schemes, flashing his Business card that described him as ‘Senior Adviser, Prime Minister’s Office.’ (“Business card puts Greensill founder at the heart of Downing Street,” Guardian, 31 March 2021; https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2021/mar/30/business-card-puts-greensill-founder-at-the-heart-of-downing-street) The Labour Party as the Official Opposition has finally woken up to the significance of the story, with shadow Cabinet Office Minister, Rachel Reeves - a former chairperson of the Business select Committee – belatedly calling for significant changes to lobbying rules. (“Labour calls for changes to lobbying law after Greensill row: Party says rules should be widened to include ‘in-house’ roles such as that carried out by David Cameron,” Guardian, 5 April 2021; https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2021/apr/04/labour-calls-for-changes-to-lobbying-law-after-greensill-row) Reeves and shadow chancellor Anneliese Dodds had earlier called for the Committee on Standards in Public Life to investigate the allegations about Cameron’s lobbying activities and the access Greensill was given to taxpayer-backed loans. Committee chair, Lord Jonathan Evans, a former director of spy agency MI5, said the advisory body “does not have a remit to investigate individual cases” but he suggested that CSPL’s ongoing Standards Matters 2 review could look at the concerns in a broader context, adding “As part of the review we are looking at the current rules and arrangements governing transparency and public appointments and we will be assessing what is working well and where there are gaps and weaknesses.” Meanwhile, Labour Party leader Sir Kier Starmer called on Cabinet Secretary Simon Case to launch a full investigation into lobbying that took place for Greensill."I think the cabinet secretary needs to look at this again in the round and I also think it's time for David Cameron to come out of hiding and start answering some questions." (“Pressure mounts for probe into Greensill Capital lobbying of Whitehall: Standards watchdog insists it “has no remit” to investigate but pledges to feed concerns into ongoing ethics review,”Civil Service World, 31 March 2021 https://www.civilserviceworld.com/news/article/pressure-mounts-for-probe-into-greensill-capital-lobbying-of-whitehall Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng asserted there was ‘nothing to see here’, suggesting to Sky News that, with Cameron having been cleared of breaking lobbying rules, people should now “just move on” from the issue, indicating his belief that “everything was above board” with the former prime minister’s connection to the financial services company which collapsed earlier in March. (“Greensill Capital: Minister tells public to ‘just move on’ from accusations of Cameron cronyism,” The London Economic, 30 March 2021;https://www.thelondoneconomic.com/politics/greensill-capital-minister-tells-public-to-just-move-on-from-accusations-of-cameron-cronyism-261789/) The Sunday Times has led the investigative reporting, most recently last weekend in a detailed two page spread based on 15 pages of internal emails involving several Government departments. (“David Cameron, Jeremy Heywood, Lex Greensill and all that 'free money',” Sunday Times, 4 April 2021; https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/david-cameron-jeremy-heywood-lex-greensill-and-all-that-free-money-slmdtxxnf; “Greensill: The Key Facts,” https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/greensill-ten-things-you-need-to-know-z0fzdfdsk) In preceding weeks, the Times and Sunday Times carried several other detailed exposés. (“David Cameron and the toxic banker Lex Greensill: the exclusive inside story,” 28 March 2021; https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/david-cameron-and-the-toxic-banker-lex-greensill-the-exclusive-inside-story-sx09g098s; “David Cameron's multiple texts to Rishi Sunak to bail out Greensill,” 21 March 2021; https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/david-cameron-lobbied-rishi-sunak-to-bail-out-failed-finance-firm-7hqq3xms3; “Gupta's eight £50m taxpayer Covid loans,” 14 March 2021; https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/sanjeev-guptas-eight-50m-taxpayer-covid-loans-clmsdh33q; “Lex Greensill’s rags-to-riches story is unravelling,” 3 March 2021; https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/lex-greensill-s-rags-to-riches-story-is-unravelling-fast-8s6twz5gn) In a coruscating critique of Cameroonian ethics, political columnist Marina Hyde attacks Cameron’s aloof distancing of himself from accountability, writing “it has now been a full 35 days since the former prime minister first declined to take calls from the Financial Times [ which has been on Cameron’s trail with excellent revelatory reportage] on the collapse and mushrooming fallout of Greensill, the specialist bank for which he was an active payrolled lobbyist with what he hoped was $60m worth of shares.” She points out that David Cameron is still allowed to claim up to £115,000 a year from the public purse to run his office, as a former prime minister, plaintively suggesting: surely that’s enough for someone in it to return a call. (“David Cameron has ghosted Britain over Greensill. At least it's not the first time,” Guardian, 6 April 2021; https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/apr/06/david-cameron-britain-greensill-access-lobbying) Another Guardian writer, Nils Pratley, a business commentator, was on the ball a fortnight ago, with an excellent piece that raised a whole series of unanswered questions, which won’t be posed by the Treasury Select Committee, whose Conservative majority voted down an inquiry into Cameron’s dealings with Greensill just before the Easter Parliamentary recess. Pratley rightly concluded that: “On the basis of what we know so far, the formal transparency demands look to be a joke.” (“Greensill Capital saga raises serious issues about politicians, officialdom and business,” Guardian, 23 March 2021; https://www.theguardian.com/business/nils-pratley-on-finance/2021/mar/22/greensill-capital-saga-raises-serious-issues-about-politicians-officialdom-and-business) Pratley also points out that Lord Paul Myners, a former City minister, has been tabling detailed written Parliamentary questions in the Lords for the past two years on Cameron, Greensill and the GFG Alliance and companies associated with the steel firm’s owner, Sanjeev Gupta. I have tracked own these questions – and the answers to them – along with some other questions posed by some other peers (and a couple of MPs more recently), and picked out the most interesting, as follows: As long ago as 10 June 2019 Crossbench peer Lord Myners asked the Treasury whether they were investigating, or intend to investigate, the (1) management of, (2) investment valuations used by, and (3) relationships between managers and businesses invested in, the GAM Greensill Supply Chain Finance Fund (GAM = Greensill Asset Management). Lord Young of Cookham replied on 24 June 2019: “The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) is the conduct regulator for the financial services industry in the UK. The FCA will not normally make public the fact that it is or is not investigating a particular matter, in order to protect the effectiveness of any investigation it carries out. The FCA has been made aware of this Parliamentary Question. “(UIL16211) [emphasis added] [ in a later written answer on 30 March 2021 theTreasury noted that the FCA had acknowledged notification of this question, but gave no futher details of any action taken by the FCA (UIN HL 14288)] On 22 June 2019 Myners again asked the Treasury whether they would investigate conflicts of interest in the promotion of trade finance bonds in association with Greensill. A different minister, Lord Agnew of Oulton, on 6 July 2019, provided an identical reply to that given on 24 June (UIN HL6017) Leap forward to 7 October 2020, and another Crossbench peer, Lord Macpherson of Earl's Court, first raised a specific question on the activities across Whitehall of Lex Greensill, asking the Cabinet Office on what occasions since 1 January 2012 Cabinet Office officials have met Lex Greensill. Lord True answered on 13 November 2020 using an evasive construction that would become typical of the way ministers would respond to such probing questions on Greensill saying : “In line with the practice of successive administrations, details of internal meetings are not normally disclosed. Details of Cabinet Office senior official (Permanent Secretary) meetings with external organisations are published on a quarterly basis, and are available on GOV.UK.(UIN HL 8878) [ emphasis added] Lord Myners returned to his probing, asking the Business Department (BEIS) on 2 November 2020 what assessment they had made of whether Greensill Capital has extended Bounce Back Loans to companies that are part of, or associated with, the GFG Alliance (Gupta’s inter-connected companies); and whether these loans complied with the eligibility criteria set by the Bounce Back Loans scheme. Lord Callanan answered on 16 November 2020: “Greensill Capital is not a Bounce Back Loan Scheme accredited lender. A full list of accredited lenders can be found on the British Business Bank website.” (UIN HL9858) On 26 November Myners followed up this question asking BEIS when they accredited Greensill to make loans under the Bounce Back Loan Scheme; how much has been lent by Greensill through that Scheme so far; and which Government department or entity is responsible for maintaining loans by Greensill under that Scheme to related entities and groups. Lord Callanan answered 10 December 2020 with an identical reply to that given on 16 November 2020 (UIN HL10777) Undeterred, Myners pursued a different tack, asking BEIS in a further question tabled on 15 December 2020 what value of loans extended by Greensill under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme had annual rates of interest of more than 10 per cent per annum; and what proportion of Greensill loans within the Scheme involved an arrangement fee of 3 per cent per annum. Lord Callanan answered on 29 December 2020 (during the Christmas Parliamentary recess) “We are unable to provide of a breakdown of Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme data by lender as this is commercially sensitive.”(UIN HL11480) (emphasis added) A distinct smell of rodent whiffed. Leap forward two more months, and Myners returned to the fro, asking the Treasury on 2 March 2021 whether (1) they, (2) the Financial Conduct Authority, or (3) the Prudential Regulation Authority, have taken any action in respect of the decision by Credit Suisse Asset Management to suspend dealing in supply chain finance funds managed by Greensill Capital because of uncertainties with respect to accurate valuation. He also asked which financial regulator has primary responsibility for supervising Greensill Capital and its affiliates? Lord Agnew replied at some length on 16 March 2021, giving an identical reply to both questions, saying: “Greensill is an international group of firms, including an Australian holding company and a German bank. There are two UK entities – Greensill Capital UK and Greensill Capital Securities Limited. Greensill Capital UK is not authorised by the UK financial authorities. It is registered under Anti-Money Laundering regulations, which means that the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) supervises it for compliance with anti-money laundering rules, but not for wider conduct issues. Greensill Capital Securities Limited is not authorised or supervised by the FCA but was an Appointed Representative of a regulated firm (Mirabella Advisers). An Appointed Representative is a firm or person who carries out regulated activities under the supervision of a firm directly authorised by the FCA (known as a principal firm). A principal firm is responsible for ensuring that its Appointed Representative complies with the requirements, rules and regulations of the FCA. HM Treasury has been working closely with the FCA and PRA to monitor developments and assess the implications for the financial sector, and with other government departments to understand any impacts that these developments may have on linked UK-based companies and the services they provide.”(UIN HL 13826) (UIN HL13827) On 3 March Myners also asked the Treasury four further questions: which financial regulator has primary responsibility for supervising Greensill Capital and its affiliates; and what steps (1) they, or (2) any regulators, have taken to check whether the insurance security offered to investors by Greensill Capital was reflected in the policies secured from insurers; and whether any such policies were written by related parties; whether they (1) are investigating, or (2) plan to investigate, matters related to a fund managed by GAM investing in securities packaged by Greensill Capital; and whether (1) they, or (2) any regulators, are investigating the impact on banks and asset managers of the suspension of dealing in funds managed by Greensill Capital, and in particular the effect on banks of (a) risk concentration limits, and (b) capital requirements. On 16 March 2021Lord Agnew also gave the self-same omnibus answer to all four as he had to the previous two questions (UIN HL13827) (UIN HL13871) (UIN HL 13872) (UIN HL13873) Trying a different tack, Myners also asked the Treasury on 2 March 2021 on how many occasions over the last six months ministers and civil servants in (1) the Cabinet Office, (2) HM Treasury, and (3) the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, hosted meetings with (a) Lex Greensill, or (b) representatives of Greensill Capital; and whether David Cameron was present at any of the meetings. Lord Agnew replied on 16 March 2021, but it barely constituted an answer: “Senior officials and ministers routinely meet with a range of private sector stakeholders. There are robust transparency processes in place to ensure appropriate scrutiny of such meetings. Transparency releases are currently publicly available for meetings up to and including September 2020, which is in line with normal reporting timelines on disclosures. These are published on a quarterly basis, with the most recent release published in February 2021.” Cryptically, he added “Mr Roxburgh’s transparency release from July-September 2020 will be published shortly, but there are no meetings with either Lex Greensill or representatives of Greensill Capital to report in this release.” (UIN HL13828) Also on 2 March 2021, Myners further probed BEIS asking what is the (1) value, and (2) number, of Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loans made through Greensill Capital or its subsidiaries and associates; what is the (a) value, and (b) number, which were at annual interest rates of 14.9 per cent or higher; and what the reasons are for Greensill having now been withdrawn from the list of government approved lenders? Lord Callanan answered on 16 March 2021 stating: “Greensill Capital were approved by the British Business Bank (the Bank) in June last year to provide finance through the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CLBILS). All accredited lenders are subject to audit by the Bank to ensure their compliance with scheme rules. If serious non-compliance is identified, the Bank is entitled to take remedial action. Such action might include termination of the Guarantee Agreement or withdrawal of the Guarantee. It would not be appropriate to comment on individual cases given commercial sensitivities. We are unable to provide of a breakdown of CLBILS data by lender as this is commercially sensitive. (UIN HL13829) (emphasis added) At this juncture, Lord Macpherson of Earl's Court returned to the Greensill matter, asking pointedly whether any meeting took place between the then Cabinet Secretary and Lex Greensill on 7 November 2017; and if so, what record exists of that meeting? Lord Agnew answered on 18 March 2021saying: “The then Cabinet Secretary and Lex Greensill met on 7 November 2017, as detailed in the relevant transparency return.” adding conveniently “The Cabinet Office does not hold a written record of the meeting.” (UIN HL 13822) (emphasis added) A fortnight later, Myners continued his probing asking BEIS on 15 March 2021, asking which government agency is responsible for monitoring the activities of Greensill Capital under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme; and whether in their monitoring duties they involved or sought advice from any other government department or regulatory agency? Lord Callanan answered on 29 March 2021 saying: “All accredited lenders across the three Covid-19 loan schemes (the Bounce Back Loan Scheme, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, and the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme) are subject to audit by the British Business Bank to ensure their compliance with scheme rules. The British Business Bank has appointed KPMG and RSM to undertake annual audits of each accredited lender under the schemes. The audit programme has been established to provide assurance as to whether the participating lenders are administering the schemes in line with guarantee agreements entered into with lenders, as well as other agreed rules and procedures of the schemes. An audit review panel within the British Business Bank has been established as the governing body that provides direction and subsequent actions based on findings from the audits. The panel’s responsibilities include reviewing all draft audit reports to determine remediation actions required by lenders. The panel also monitors auditor performance and agrees the strategy for the following year with respect to operational audits.” (UIN HL14228) On the same day, 15 March 2021, Myners also asked BEIS which government department was responsible for approving Greensill Capital as a lender under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme; and whether in making this decision they took advice from any other government department or regulatory agency? Lord Callanan answered on 29 March 2021 saying: “The British Business Bank is responsible for accrediting lenders to the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS).Greensill Capital (UK) Limited were approved by the British Business Bank for CBILS and the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme last year in accordance with its published guidance on accreditation.”(UIN HL14227) On 16 March 2021, Myners spread his probing net wider, asking the Treasury what role the (1) Financial Conduct Authority, and (2) Prudential Regulation Authority, played in granting regulatory approval for Greensill Capital or its associates; and whether they advised BaFin in connection with the acquisition of Greensill Bank in Germany? Lord Agnew answered on 30 March 2021stating: “Greensill Capital (UK) Limited was not authorised by the FCA. It was a registered entity under the Money Laundering Regulations, which means that it was subject to FCA regulation only for compliance with Anti-Money Laundering rules, not for wider conduct issues. Greensill Capital Securities Ltd was an Appointed Representative of an FCA-regulated firm, under whose supervision it could conduct some regulated activities. However, it was not itself supervised or authorised by the FCA. Greensill Capital Securities Ltd is no longer an Appointed Representative. At no time has the Bank of England authorised or supervised Greensill Bank AG, Greensill Capital (UK) Limited or any member of their group. The UK Financial Authorities were not involved in the acquisition of Greensill Bank AG by Greensill Capital PTY in 2014.” (UIN HL 14287) At this point, Labour shadow chancellor Anneliese Dodds woke up, belatedly recognizing there was indeed something here that should concern her in her important opposition portfolio, asking two questions of the Chancellor on 17 March 2021 (1) if his Department would publish the dates of the five most recent occasions any Minister in his Department met with (a) Greensill Capital or (b) representatives of Greensill Capital; and (2) what meetings (a) he or (b) Ministers in his Department had with (i) Greensill Capital or (ii) representatives of Greensill to discuss access to covid-19 support schemes in 2020? Treasury minister John Glen replied on 22 March 2021 using an evasive construction that would be used in several subsequent replies to impertinently probing questions “Ministers routinely meet with a range of private sector stakeholders. Transparency releases are published on a quarterly basis, and are currently publicly available for Ministerial meetings up to and including September 2020, which is in line with normal reporting timelines on disclosures.” (UIN 170732) (170730) The identical evasive reply was used by Mr Glen on 25 March 2021 in responses to shadow business minister Pat McFadden’s questions to the Chancellor on 22 March 2021 asking if he would list the dates of his contacts with David Cameron in relation to Greensill Capital; if he would publish the notes made at the meetings between his officials and Greensill Capital.? (UIN 172949) (UIN 172947) SNP MP Alison Thewliss got an identical unhelpful response from John Glen on 25 March 2021 to her question asked on 22 March 2021 enquiring of the Chancellor if he would publish the notes made at the meetings between his officials and Greensill Capital. (UIN 173073) As did Myners, in four identical responses by Lord Agnew on 30 March 2021 to his questions of 16 March asking the Treasury whether (1) ministers, or (2) senior civil servants, have met either (a) Mr Lex Greensill, or (b) representatives of Greensill Capital or SoftBank, since 1 January; and if so, (i) who attended the meeting, and (ii) on what dates were the meetings held and his question submitted on 17 March 2021 asking further to the Written Answer by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 16 March (HL13828), what records they hold of (1) correspondence, or (2) telephone conversations, between ministers and officials in (a) Her Majesty’s Treasury, (b) the Cabinet Office, or (c) the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy about (i) Lex Greensill, (ii) representatives of Greensill Capital, or (iii) the Rt Hon David Cameron, on matters relating to Greensill Capital; and his questions tabled on 19 March 2021 asking further the Written Answer reply by Lord Agnew of Oulton on 16 March (HL13828), whether David Cameron attended any meetings with ministers or civil servants relating to Greensill Capital; and whether records at HM Treasury record or refer to any conversation since 1 January between David Cameron and ministers or senior civil servants relating to (a) Mr Lex Greensill, (b) Greensill Capital, or (c) Mr Sanjeev Gupta and his businesses; and if so, whether they will place copies of these records in the Library of the House? (UIN HL 14286) (UIN HL14333) (UIN HL14415) (UIN HL14414). A Labour peer, Lord Sikka, got in on the Greensill probing act asking the Treasury on 22 March what record they have of (1) letters, (2) emails, (3) phone calls, (4) text messages, and (5) other communications, from former Prime Minister David Cameron to officials in (a) the Treasury, and (b) the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, in connection with Greensill Capital? But only received the same standard response from Lord Agnew on 30 March 2021 as did Myners to his four multiple questions above (UIN HL 14469) In a further question submitted on 22 March 2021 Pat McFadden asked the BEIS Secretary if he would list the amount and recipient of each loan made by Greensill Capital under the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme? Business minister Paul Scully evasively answered on 30 March 2021stating: “Details of facilities made available under the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme will be published where required via the European Commission’s Transparency Aid Module.” In a further question tabled by Myners on 16 March 2021, he asked BEIS (1) when, and (2) for what reasons, they withdrew Greensill Capital’s approval as a Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme lender? He was in reply told by Lord Callanan on 30 March 2021: “The British Business Bank is tasked with administering the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) to ensure compliance with its terms. The details of its compliance activity with individual lenders is a commercially sensitive matter. While the Bank looks into Greensill’s position, it is not able to originate new lending that benefits from a Government guarantee.”(UIN HL 14285) Myners returned to the fray asking the Treasury on 23 March what discussions they had with the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) about Greensill Capital and anti-money laundering regulations; and on what dates the FCA visited Greensill Capital in relation to such regulations? He was told by Lord Agnew on 31 March 2021: “The FCA is the supervisor for firms registered as Annex 1 firms under the Money Laundering Regulations 2017. Greensill Capital UK (Limited) was not authorised by the FCA. It was a registered entity under the Money Laundering Regulations, which means that it was subject to FCA regulation only for compliance with Anti-Money Laundering rules, not for wider conduct issues. Greensill Capital Securities Ltd was an Appointed Representative of an FCA-regulated firm, under whose supervision it could conduct some regulated activities. However, it was not itself supervised or authorised by the FCA. Greensill Capital Securities Ltd is no longer an Appointed Representative.” Lord Agnew added unhelpfully: “It would not be appropriate for HM Treasury to comment on the actions taken by an independent regulator regarding an individual firm.” (UIN HL14528) Lord Sikka also asked the Treasury on 19 March 2021 what records they have of (1) the dates of meetings between the Financial Conduct Authority, the directors of Greensill Capital, and that company’s auditors, and (2) the details of matters discussed at any such meetings? Lord Agnew told him on 31 March 2021 that: “This is a matter for the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which is operationally independent from Government. The question has been passed on to the FCA. The FCA will reply directly to the noble Lord by letter. A copy of the letter will be placed in the Library of the House.” (UIN HL 14425) Lord Sikka then chipped in with another interesting question on 22 March 2021, asking the Treasury on what dates capital adequacy and stress tests were carried out on Greensill Capital; and what the outcome was of those checks? Lord Agnew responded on 31 March 2021 saying “Greensill Capital (UK) Limited was not authorised by the FCA. It was a registered entity under the Money Laundering Regulations, which means that the FCA supervised it but only for compliance with Anti-Money Laundering rules, not for wider conduct issues. Greensill Capital Securities Ltd was an Appointed Representative of an FCA-regulated firm, under whose supervision it could conduct some regulated activities. However, it was not itself supervised or authorised by the FCA. Greensill Capital Securities Ltd is no longer an Appointed Representative. (emphasis added) At no time has the Bank of England authorised or supervised Greensill Capital (UK) Limited or any member of their group. Given Greensill Capital was not authorised by the Bank of England or the FCA no capital adequacy or stress tests were required or carried out.” (UIN HL 14467) This week Lord Myners has received further ministerial answers. In response to his question tabled to BEIS on 24 March 2021 asking which entities owned by Sanjeev Gupta did the British Business Bank extend the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme; who was responsible for (1) credit assessment, and (2) due diligence; and from which accounts were any loans issued? Lord Callanan responded on 6 April 2021 again hiding behind commercial secrecy: “We are unable to provide information relating to individual borrowers as it is commercially sensitive. However, details of facilities made available under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) will be published where required by the European Commission’s Transparency Aid Module in due course. CBILS facilities are delivered through the British Business Bank’s accredited lenders, who are responsible for making credit decisions in accordance with the scheme’s rules.” (UIN HL 14590) ( emphasis added) Myners also asked BEIS on 23 March 2021 why Greensill Capital remains listed on the British Business Bank website as an accredited lender? Lord Callanan told him on 6 April 2021, again laced with secrecy, that: “The British Business Bank is tasked with administering the Covid-19 debt guarantee schemes to ensure compliance with its terms. The details of its compliance activity with individual lenders is a commercially sensitive matter. (emphasis added) While the Bank looks into Greensill’s position it is not able to originate new lending that benefits from a Government guarantee.” (UIN HL 14524) There are a series of further written questions submitted due for reply after the Easter Parliamentary Recess Bill Crothers and Lex Greensill Question for Cabinet Office UIN HL14589, tabled on 24 March 2021 Question by Lord Myners To ask Her Majesty's Government who was responsible for the appointment of Lex Greensill as a Crown Representative in March 2014, including him being issued a Cabinet Office entry pass; whether Bill Crother's appointment to the UK Board of Greensill Capital was (1) reviewed, and (2) approved, by the Advisory Committee on Business Appointments; and, if so, when. (Due for answer by 9 April 2021) Lex Greensill Question for Cabinet Office UIN HL14526, tabled on 23 March 2021 Question by Lord Myners To ask Her Majesty's Government whether Mr Lex Greensill had an entry pass (1) to Number 10 Downing Street, or (2) to the Cabinet Office; and if so, who made the request for the pass. (Due for answer by 8 April 2021) To be answered by the Cabinet Office Lex Greensill Question for Cabinet Office UIN HL14525, tabled on 23 March 2021 Question by Lord Myners To ask Her Majesty's Government who nominated Mr Lex Greensill as a Crown Representative in March 2014; whether Mr Greensill continues to hold this status; and if not, (1) when did he cease to be a Crown Representative, and (2) why. (Due for answer by 8 April 2021) David Cameron Question for Cabinet Office UIN HL14413, tabled on 19 March 2021 Question by Lord Myners To ask Her Majesty's Government whether records held in (1) 10 Downing Street and, (2) the Cabinet Office, record or refer to any conversation since 1 January between David Cameron and ministers or senior civil servants relating to (a) Mr Lex Greensill, (b) Greensill Capital, or (c) Mr Sanjeev Gupta and his businesses; and if so, whether they will place copies of these records in the Library of the House. (Due for answer 6 April 2021) Lex Greensill Question for Cabinet Office UIN HL13870, tabled on 3 March 2021 Question by Lord Myners To ask Her Majesty's Government what functions Lex Greensill performed as a Crown Representative; how long he held that position; which person or office he reported to; and who was responsible for his appointment to that position. Awaiting response: due for answer by 17 March 2021 Greensill Question for Treasury UIN 175795, tabled on 25 March 2021 Question by Labour MP Nick Smith To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he had (a) discussions and (b) text communication with former Prime Minister David Cameron in Government support to Greensill Capital. (Due for answer by 13 April 2021) Greensill: Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme Question for Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy UIN 174733, tabled on 24 March 2021 Question by Labour MP Dame Angela Eagle To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment his Department made of the suitability of Greensill Capital to become an accredited lender under the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme. (Due for answer by 13 April 2021) Greensill: Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme Question for Treasury UIN 174732, tabled on 24 March 2021 Question by Labour MP Dame Angela Eagle To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions his Department had with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on the decision to make Greensill Capital an accredited lender under the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme. (Due for answer by 13 April 2021)

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